Video 21 Oct 87,732 notes

dekuswan:

wunderbird:

summonerseina:

♥ -it!  -  Support the artist

// Support ALL the artists //

PLEASE!  YOU HAVE NO IDEA HOW IMPORTANT THIS IS TO ME AND A MULTITUDE OF MY FRIENDS.  I GET DISCOURAGED ALL-THE-TIME ABOUT MY ART BECAUSE I GET LITTLE TO NO RECOGNITION.  SO I BEG YOU, IF YOU LIKE SOMETHING, PLEASE MAKE IT KNOWN.  LEAVE A COMMENT, REBLOG IT TO SEVERAL PLACES, SHOW YOUR FRIENDS!  IF YOU HELP BUILD AN ARTISTS CONFIDENCE, THEIR CREATIVITY WILL KNOW NO BOUNDS.

No seriously this is an actual problem I have. Like when no one seems to notice my art after I’ve worked for days on it, it honestly really hurts. So seriously if you like someones art make it known. It helps us so so much

(Source: ask-human-poro)

Text 19 Oct 19,739 notes

wsswatson:

a bi/pan person marrying someone does not indicate a preference for that gender, it indicates a preference for that PERSON

Text 18 Oct 1 note

Ugh I feel ill. People have been far too generous with their colds.

Time for pho.

And then I get to give it to half an auditorium as pet and I have a lecture to attend tonight.

Photo 18 Oct 48,294 notes skelefolk:

mutedmirth:

daddyzebra:

perplexingpariah:

owlygem:

thalassa-gramarye:

zerostatereflex:

Not everyone sees the same color when they stare at this spinning disk.
The gif is called, “Benham’s disk" "is named after the English toymaker Charles Benham, who in 1895 sold a top painted with the pattern shown. When the disk is spun, arcs of pale color, called Fechner colors or pattern-induced flicker colors (PIFCs), are visible at different places on the disk. Not everyone sees the same colors."
"The phenomenon originates from neural activity in the retina and spatial interactions in the primary visual cortex, which plays a role in encoding low-level image features, such as edges and spatiotemporal frequency components."
Fascinating how our brains work, I see a brown tan, what do you see? :D

Light blue?

lemon yellow sss!



I see two colors, what the fuck?

Same, the light blue and that mustard-brown type yellow.

I would assume it might be a negative after-image? I’m seeing it too

I see a range of colors from grey blues to lime greens to deep tans.

skelefolk:

mutedmirth:

daddyzebra:

perplexingpariah:

owlygem:

thalassa-gramarye:

zerostatereflex:

Not everyone sees the same color when they stare at this spinning disk.

The gif is called, “Benham’s disk" "is named after the English toymaker Charles Benham, who in 1895 sold a top painted with the pattern shown. When the disk is spun, arcs of pale color, called Fechner colors or pattern-induced flicker colors (PIFCs), are visible at different places on the disk. Not everyone sees the same colors."

"The phenomenon originates from neural activity in the retina and spatial interactions in the primary visual cortex, which plays a role in encoding low-level image features, such as edges and spatiotemporal frequency components."

Fascinating how our brains work, I see a brown tan, what do you see? :D

Light blue?

lemon yellow sss!

image

I see two colors, what the fuck?

Same, the light blue and that mustard-brown type yellow.

I would assume it might be a negative after-image? I’m seeing it too

I see a range of colors from grey blues to lime greens to deep tans.

Link 18 Oct On Arguments»

Wrote and posted this yesterday. I downloaded the Wordpress app for my kindle as I was stuck on the couch for… related reasons.

Photo 17 Oct 38,374 notes naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

Video 16 Oct 29,522 notes
Photo 16 Oct 10 notes winona-the-lovesick:

askwilliamcarter:

curse-of-the-lumberjack:

askwilliamcarter:

There is a God.

ooc; I hate both of you. Me and my $3.30 gas

Dude if we have 3.15 and under already I’m sure you’ll have lower gas too.

((WHERE DO Y’ALL LIVE

gas is 3.85 in the land of the Charlie
hence why I take the bus

winona-the-lovesick:

askwilliamcarter:

curse-of-the-lumberjack:

askwilliamcarter:

There is a God.

ooc; I hate both of you. Me and my $3.30 gas

Dude if we have 3.15 and under already I’m sure you’ll have lower gas too.

((WHERE DO Y’ALL LIVE

gas is 3.85 in the land of the Charlie

hence why I take the bus

Video 16 Oct 105,272 notes

cornerwhereicanhide:

acidandtender:

This man fucking gets it.

This is so incredibly important.

(Source: universalequalityisinevitable)

Video 15 Oct 131,046 notes

squided:

chronicarus:

Spiders with water droplet hats are something I really needed to know about.

For being spiders, they’re surprisingly cute


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